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Month: March 2017

Meet the Top 15 Most Successful Iranian Women on Intl. Women’s Day 2017

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International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

The United Nations first began celebrating the day on 8 March in 1975, and each year has given focus to women’s status around the globe.

Started as a Socialist political event, the holiday blended the ethos of many countries, primarily in Europe, especially those in the S.Bloc.

In some regions, the day missing its political flavor, and became basic an occasion for people to express their love for women in a way somewhat similar to a mixture of Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day.

In other regions, however, the political and human rights theme designated by the United Nations runs strong, and political and social cognizance of the struggles of female worldwide are brought out and examined in a hopeful demeanor.

Meet the Top 15 Most Successful Iranian Women on Intl. Women’s Day:

1- Anousheh Ansari

Anousheh Ansari  (born September 12, 1966, in Mashhad, Iran) is an Iranian-American engineer and co-founder and chairwoman of Prodea Systems. Her previous business accomplishments include serving as co-founder and CEO of Telecom Technologies, Inc.  In 2001 in a stock-for-stock transaction for 10.8 million shares of Sonus stock. Anousheh Ansari became “a vice president of Sonus and general manager of Sonus’ new INtelligentIP division.”In 2006, she co-founded Prodea Systems, and is the current chairman and CEO. Ansari was the fourth overall self-funded space traveler, and the first self-funded woman to fly to the International Space Station.

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2- Parisa Tabriz

Parisa Tabriz born 1983 is an American computer security expert. Forbes included her in their, “30 Under 30” list (30 Tech Pioneers under the age of 30) and she now works for Google as the self-appointed, Security Princess, and head of the team responsible for Chrome Security. She joined Google just a few months after graduation. Tabriz was born to a Polish-American mother, a nurse, and an Iranian-immigrant father, a doctor.

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3- Roxanna Varza

Roxanne Varza currently leads Microsoft’s startup activities in France, running both Bizspark and Microsoft Ventures programs. In April 2013, Business Insider listed her as one of the top 30 women under 30 in tech.  Prior to Microsoft, she worked for several European startups and was also the Editor of TechCrunch France. She also co-founded the French and British chapters of Girls in Tech and is the co-organizer of the Failcon Paris conference. Roxanne is trilingual, an epilepsy advocate, and holds degrees from UCLA, Sciences Po Paris and the London School of Economics.

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4- Soraya Darabi

Soraya Darabi is the co-founder of Zady, a mission-driven content and commerce brand described best as “The Whole Foods of Fashion.” Zady creates and sells stylish, timeless, sustainably produced apparel and tells the story of each product, down to the raw materials.  Soraya began her career as Manager of Digital Partnerships and Social Media at The New York Times, where she kept her finger on the pulse of today’s ever-changing digital landscape. While at The Times, she positioned the global news leader on social networks such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, partnered with startups large and small, and established award winning campaigns. Soraya received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Georgetown University and now lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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5- Roxana Moslehi

Roxana Moslehi, Ph.D. is a genetic epidemiologist. Most of her research is dedicated to the study of cancer and cancer precursors. Born in Iran and raised in Canada, she is currently an associate professor in Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNY), where she has been teaching multiple courses, including those she developed in genetic and molecular epidemiology. Through her research she has been contributing to the understanding of hereditary causes of diseases as well as the influence of gene-environment interactions on the risk of developing disease.

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6- Maryam Mirzakhani

Maryam Mirzakhani is an Iranian mathematician working in the United States. Since 1 September 2008, she has served as a professor of mathematics at Stanford University. In 2014, Mirzakhani became both the first woman and the first Iranian honored with the Fields Medal, the most prestigious award in mathematics. The award committee cited her work in understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces. Her research topics include Teichmüller theory, hyperbolic geometry, ergodic theory, and symplectic geometry

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7- Maria Khorsand

Maria Khorsand, M.Sc. Computer Science, serves as the Chief Executive Officer of SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Sweden. Ms. Khorsand has been the President of the Financial Markets at OMX Technology AB since April 2004. She has been the President of Ericsson Technology Licensing since 2001. She worked within OMX Technology, as the Chief Executive Officer of Ericsson Technology Licensing and as Chief Executive Officer of Dell AB. Ms. Khorsand has been a Member of … the Board of Directors at Beijer Electronics AB since April 2010. She holds M.Sc. degree in Computer Science.

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8- Pardis Sabeti

Pardis C. Sabeti is an Iranian-American computational biologist, medical geneticist and evolutionary geneticist, who developed a bioinformatic statistical method which identifies sections of the genome that have been subject to natural selection and an algorithm which explains the effects of genetics on the evolution of disease. In 2014, Sabeti headed a group which used advanced genomic sequencing technology to identify a single point of infection from an animal reservoir to a human in the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. RNA changes suggests that the first human infection was followed by exclusive human to human transmissions. Sabeti is a full professor in the Center for Systems Biology and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University and on the faculty of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics at the Harvard School of Public Health, and is a senior associate member at the Broad Institute

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9- Christiane Amanpour

Christiane Amanpour is a British-Iranian journalist and television host. Amanpour is the Chief International Correspondent for CNN and host of CNN International’s nightly interview program Amanpour. Amanpour is also a Global Affairs Anchor of ABC News. As of 2014, she has been recognized as one of the journalists most world leaders follow on Twitter, according to a report by the PR firm Burson-Marsteller.

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10- Minoo Akhtarzand

Minoo Akhtarzand is the current governor of Jönköping County, Sweden. Minoo Akhtarzand was born and raised in Tehran. Her father was a high-ranking officer in the Shah’s army. At the age of 17 she moved to Stockholm to study at the Royal Institute of Technology. Later she held various managerial posts at the Swedish energy company Vattenfall and was the director of the former regional labour agency in Uppsala. In February 2008 she was appointed Director-General at Banverket, the Swedish Rail Administration. She was elected a Vice-President of European Rail Infrastructure Managers in June 2009. She became the last Director-General of Banverket as that government agency merged with the Swedish Road Administration (Vägverket) in 2010 to create the new Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket). In September 2010 she was appointed the governor of Jönköping County.

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11- Taraneh Razavi

Taraneh Razavi is not your ordinary physician. She’s the doctor at Google headquarters in Mountain View, California, where she’s in charge of maintaining the Googlers in good health. But she’s also interested in how tech trends affect our health and preventive care in general.

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12- Rudi Bakhtiar

Rudi (Rudabeh) Bakhtiar is a producer for Thomson Reuters television. She is most known for anchoring a prime time national three-hour newscast in the United States, called “CNN Headline News Tonight”. She also anchored other high profile newscasts for CNN, including Anderson Cooper 360. She has over a decade of experience working for major international news outlets CNN, Voice of America, and Reuters News.

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13- Goli Ameri

Goli Ameri is an Iranian-American diplomat and businesswoman. She is the President and CEO of the Center for Global Engagement, a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering engagement between U.S. society and the rest of the world with a view to promoting shared values and common interests and increasing mutual understanding and respect.[1] She is the former Under Secretary General for Humanitarian Values and Diplomacy for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. She is also the former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs. She ran for the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican in 2004 and is a former U.S. Representative to the United Nations.

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14- Mona jarrahi

Born in Iran, professor Mona Jarrahi is one of Iran’s and also world’s most influential scientist, mathematician, physicist, and senior researcher and professors at the Terahertz Electronics Laboratory Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Professor Jarrahi is one of the youngest Assistant Professors at Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and also at Berkeley Micromechanical Analysis and Design Laboratory – University of California, Berkeley.

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15- Farah Karimi

Farahnaz (Farah) Karimi is an Iranian-Dutch politician. She was a member of the House of Representatives between 1998 and 2006 for GreenLeft.

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Meet the top 10 hotels in Iran

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Explore our selection of top luxury hotels in Iran carefully selected by our team of luxury travel experts.
1-Parsian Azadi Hotel, Tehran
Parsian azadi Hotel
2- Abbassi Hotel, Isfahan
2- Abbassi Hotel, Isfahan
3- Darvishi Royal Hotel, Mashhad
3- Darvishi Royal Hotel, Mashhad
4- Zandiyeh Hotel , Shiraz
Zandieh Hotel for Life

5-Parsian Khazar Hotel, Chaloos

5-Parsian Khazar Hotel, Chaloos
6-Espinas Palace Hotel, Tehran
6-Espinas Palace Hotel, Tehran
7- laleh kandovan international rocky hotel, Tabriz
7- laleh kandovan international rocky hotel, Tabriz
8-Pars Hotel, Tabriz
8-Pars Hotel, Tabriz
9-Ghasr Talaee International Hotel, Mashhad
9-Ghasr Talaee International Hotel, Mashhad
10-Ramsar Parsian Hotel, Ramsar
10-Ramsar Parsian Hotel, Ramsar
We promise if you are visiting Iran you will not just like, but love at least one of these places.

How to celebrate Nowruz, the Persian New Year, like a pro

Nowruz (literally translated as “new day” in Farsi) is celebrated by over 75 million people from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds in lands that once belonged to the Persian Empire.
Here are a few expert tips to get you celebrating Nowruz like a pro.
1. Take a crash course on Zoroastrianism
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Zoroastar is depicted in this painting of “The School of Athens.” (Photo via Wikipedia)
Nowruz is believed to have been invented by Zoroastar, the leader of the religion and ancient philosophy of Zoroastrianism.

It emphasizes the broad concept and differences of “good” and “evil.” Believers should be connected to nature and animals, and always respect the element of fire.
2. Meet the Persian Santa Claus

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Haji Firooz gives gifts to celebrators and covers his hands and face with soot. (Photo via Flickr by Sina S)
Haji Firouz, who is known as the “Santa Claus” of this holiday, has been referred to as the Zoroastrian fire keeper, as his face and hands are painted black to represent soot from the fire.

He wears a red cloak and a red felt hat, sings songs on new year and gives gifts to all the children and people who are celebrating. He plays his loud tambourine and sings traditional songs, bringing joyfulness to the Nowruz celebration.
3. Learn the new year greeting, “No-Rooz Mobarak!”

During this time of year, Iranians prepare for the occasion by cleaning their homes, getting ready for guests to come over and share the traditional meal of “sabzi-polo-mahi,” salmon and spinach rice.

Hosts greet their guests by kissing one another on the cheek in gratitude and give the new year greeting, “No-Rooz Mobarak!”

4. Jump over fire!
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A child celebrates Chahārshanbe Suri by leaping over fire. (Photo via Flickr by Quinn Dombrowski)
On the last Wednesday of the year, Iranians celebrate Chahārshanbe Suri. People gather together in the streets and alleys to make bonfires and jump over them while singing the traditional songs.

Jumping over the fire is believed to be burning out all of your fear in your subconscious and spirit, in order to enter the new year brand new.

Traditionally on this night, many children also wrap themselves in cloaks, going door to door and banging spoons on pots and pans, asking for treats from the neighbors.

It is believed that the louder the children bang their spoons, the more they are beating out the last unlucky Wednesday of the New Year.

5. Know how to set your table
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A traditional table is set for Nowruz, complete with the “Seven S’s,” gold fish, painted eggs and a mirror. (Photo via Flickr by Remy)
Iranians traditionally gather around a “Haft-Seen” (translated as Seven-S’s), which is the traditional table setting to bring in the new year and the new beginnings of spring.

It consists of seven items that in Farsi begin with the letter “S.”

Sabzeh (lentil sprouts that grow in a dish, symbolizing rebirth)
Samanu (sweet pudding made from wheat, symbolizing affluence)
Senjed (dried fruit of the oleaster tree, symbolizing love)
Seer (garlic, symbolizing medicine)
Seeb (apple, symbolizing health and beauty)
Somaq (sumac berries, symbolizing the color of the sunrise)
Serkeh (vinegar, symbolzing age and patience)
Also on the “Haft-Seen,” many people decorate eggs for good luck and fertility. There may also be a goldfish in a bowl to represent new beginnings and a mirror, to always look at your reflection.
6. Pick a book to complete your table
Iranians have been placing the “Shahnameh: The Epic of Persian Kings” at their Haft-Seen. This classic book was written over a thousand years ago by the great poet Abolqasem Ferdowsi, with over 50,000 verses of Persian history, mythological stories and heroic kings.

Originally, the book was written strictly in Farsi, in order to keep the stories and its language as pure as possible, and rarely translated to other languages.

In 2013, Ahmad Sadri’s version of the “Shahnameh” came to surface along with beautiful images by Hamid Rahmanian. Together they created an English translation of this epic book, creating more opportunities for non-Iranians to learn about Iranian history and culture.
7. Eat at a Persian restaurant

Iranians are extremely welcoming to others and love sharing cultural experiences. This is a great time of year to check out Persian cuisines.

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